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Thoughts Like Music
...original soundtrack not available...you'll thank us...
Remembrance Sunday 
9th-Nov-2008 01:45 pm
little me
Today, I remember especially my grandfathers.

W. Taylor, Technical Sergeant
H. Murphy, Staff Seargeant

Who do you remember?
comments 
9th-Nov-2008 02:19 pm (UTC)
I remember Tom McCamley, member of the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards. He was not lost in battle but remained proud of his service until his death in 1999.

He was also my first (and only) father-in-law and I miss him still.
9th-Nov-2008 03:09 pm (UTC)
May he rest in peace.
9th-Nov-2008 05:37 pm (UTC)
My grandfathers both fought in World War II. On my father's side, he fought in the Mediterranean & was captured on Crete in 1941. On my mother's side, he fought on the western front as an Artillery spotter. both survived and lived long & happy lives into their 80's
9th-Nov-2008 07:19 pm (UTC)
My Aunty Liz - as always. She died 12 years ago of a rare degenerative disorder and because she lived in Oz I never got over there for the funeral. I kind of will always regret that.

I also remember all my grandparents who lived (and the boys fought) valiently through WW2 and survived into their 80s.
9th-Nov-2008 09:35 pm (UTC)
My Grandad was in WWI and WWII, he was in the Sherwood Foresters, at the battle of Ypres. Wounded in WWI he was in the catering corps in WWII. Born in 1895, died around 90 years later.
9th-Nov-2008 10:06 pm (UTC)
Pvt John Miller late of the Cameronians and Lovat Scouts. Died in 1990 and rarely talked of the war. I have requested his service records. The only thing he ever really said "The value of your own life is really proven when you save the lives of others"

and I continue to send safe wishes to my cousin whom I usually refer to Super Amazing Soldier cousin in posts. He is somewhere overseas doing whatever he does.
9th-Nov-2008 11:59 pm (UTC)
People I'm remembering today:

My maternal grandfather, who was the first bomb disposal man in Egypt, aged 20. They sent him everything they had on German bombs and told him to get on with it, which he did.

Here's a story he used to tell us: when he was called to an unexploded bomb, he used to evacuate the area, go up to the bomb and tie a string to the fuse. He'd then retreat to the end of the string, and pull out the fuse, which would explode the bomb.

Every time he did this, the string would get a little bit shorter, and every so often, he would have to remember to replace it with a new piece...

It's a wonder he survived to have any children, frankly. But he did (he also took part in the Normandy landings and would have gone on to Japan, except that the bomb was dropped then). He died last year, and his absence is greatly felt.

My granny lived through the Blitz as a young civil servant in London. She's still with us.

My paternal grandfather was in a reserved occupation and I don't know much about his war, probably because he died when I was five. He was a somewhat anxious person, and I don't imagine he necessarily had a soft time of it, especially as he must have constantly had to explain why he wasn't in uniform. Still, he undoubtedly had a safer war than many.

There was also my great-grandfather, shot in the hand at Gallipoli (he died when I was two, but I can just remember him). He was a newspaper compositor. After the war he learned to do it again with nine fingers. His best friend, Buddy Johnston, who had emigrated to Australia and joined up from there, didn't come back. My mother has told us his sad story, and we sometimes wonder if we're the only ones who know it.Here it is.

My great-great-uncle Alec was gassed in the trenches and never fully recovered. He died in 1921, but he and my great-grandmother were close, and her remembrance made him real to my mother.

As you can see, we're a family that remember quite a long way back.
10th-Nov-2008 02:31 pm (UTC) - family remembrance
My maternal grandfather, Clyde Mills Sunderland, served in WWI but never talked of it to us. However, he was a great lover of poetry and could recite much of it by memory. I remember walking to church with him (he had the longest legs and I had a hard time keeping up) and he would often have a poem for the service. Wish I had a memory like that.
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